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Queens Valley

The Royal tombs at the Valley of the Queens. The Valley of the Queens consists of the main wadi which contains most of the tombs, as well as the Valley of Prince Ahmose, the Valley of the Rope, the Valley of the Three Pits, and the Valley of the Dolmen. The main wadi contains 91 tombs and the subsidiary valleys add another 19 tombs. The burials in the subsidiary valleys all date to the 18th dynasty.
One of the first tombs to be made in the Valley of the Queens is the tomb of Princess Ahmose, a daughter of Seqenenre Tao and Queen Sitdjehuti. This tomb likely dates to the reign of Thutmose I. The tomb from this period also include several members of the nobility, including a head of the stables and a Vizier.
The tombs from the Valley of the Three Pits mostly date to the Thutmosid period. The tombs are labeled with letters A – L. The valley also contains three shaft tombs for which the valley was given its name. The modern labels for these three tombs are QV 89, QV 90, and QV 91.[1]

The Valley of the Dolmen contains an old trail used by the workmen traveling from Deir el-Medina to the Valley of the Queens. Along this path is a small rock-cut temple dedicated to Ptah and Meretseger.

The tombs from this time period are generally simple in form and consist of a chamber and a shaft for burial. Some of the tomb were extended in size to accommodate more than one burial. The tombs include those of several royal princes and princesses, as well as some nobles.[1]

A tomb of the Princesses was located in the Valley. This tomb dates to the time of Amenhotep III. The present location is unknown, but finds from the tomb are in museums and include fragments of burial equipments for several members of the royal family.[2] Some finds include a canopic jar fragment of the King’s Wife He-nut. She is thought to have lived mid 18th Dynasty. Her name was enclosed in a cartouche. Canopic jar fragments mentioning Prince Menkheperre, a son of Tutmose III and Merytre Hatshepsut was found. A King’s Great Wife Nebetnehat from the mid 18th Dynasty is attested because her name was enclosed in a cartouche on canonic fragments. Canopic jar fragments with the name of the King’s Daughter Ti from the mid 18th Dynasty were found as well.
The first tomb at the main valley dates to the beginning of the 18th dynasty and with that of Sat-re the main valley, also known as Ta-set-neferu, established the burial place for the future royal families.
The center hill is almost completely occupied by the family of Ramses II, his mother Mut-Thuya QV80, his wife Nefertari QV66 and his daughters. Strangely enough he chose for his sons another location, Kings Valley KV5.


Amenherkhopsef QV55

Amenherkhopsef QV55

He was the eldest son of Ramses III, and was named after one of the sons of Ramses II. Out of admiration he in fact all of his children after his great example Ramses II. Amenherkhepsef died at the age of approx 15 years. He is not identical with another...
Khaemwaset QV44

Khaemwaset QV44

He was the son on Ramses III and like many of his brothers named after the sons of Ramses II. He and his brother Pareherwenemef are mentioned as Eldest Kings son, so the probably had different mothers. Khaemwaset was a priest in the temple of Ptah, though...
Nefertari QV66

Nefertari QV66

Nefertari, wife of Ramses II, "hmt nswt wrt" and "nbt tawy", Great Royal wife and Mistress of the Two Lands has her tomb in the central part of the valley almost next to her mother-in-law, mut Tuyu, wife of Seti I and mother of Ramses II. She was the...

Nefertari QV66

Nefertari was married to Ramses II, and held several titles: "Great Royal wife", "Mistress of the Two Lands", "Kings mother", all indicating she was the imported one, the number One and the mother of the hereditary prince Amunherkhepsef. Nefertari, wife...
Setherkhepsef QV43

Setherkhepsef QV43

This tomb of one of the sons of Ramses III has never been used for a burial. The prince eventually came on the thrown as Ramses VIII and therefor started a new tomb at the Valley of the Kings, however neither his mummy nor his tomb ever have been found...
Tyti QV52

Tyti QV52

For long it was uncertain to which farao she was married, but the latest records say she was Kings daughter, Kings sister, wife and mother of Kings. Her name appears also in the Harris papyrus, in which tomb robbers confessed about the theft of her jewelry...

 

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